As you may have noticed, SF.net has recently been under attack and all who have an account there recieved by e-mail that they have to recover their accounts in order to continue using SF.net.

While I sympathise with SF.net for what they're going through right now, I still took the oportunity to cancel my account there.

It wasn't an easy decision to make, but since I had an uneasy feeling with its ToS already before – especially this bit:

Prohibited Persons

You represent you are not a person on a list barring you from receiving services under U.S. laws or other applicable jurisdiction, including without limitations, the Denied Persons List and the Entity List, and other lists issued by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security, detailed at http://www.bis.doc.gov/complianceandenforcement/ListsToCheck.htm (or successor sites thereto). Users residing in countries on the United States Office of Foreign Assets Control sanction list, including Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Sudan and Syria, may not post Content to, or access Content available through, SourceForge.net.

and

Encryption

You are aware that all postings of open source encryption code controlled under U.S. Export Control Classification Number (ECCN) 5D002 must be simultaneously reported by email to the U.S. government. You are responsible for submitting this email report to the U.S. government in accordance with procedures described in: http://www.bis.doc.gov/encryption/PubAvailEncSourceCodeNofify.html and Section 740.13(e) of the Export Administration Regulations ("EAR") 15 C.F.R. Parts 730-772.

…which actually means that any code you posted on SF.net under a Free license, which permits anyone to use, study, share and build upon your work for any use whatsoever won't be able to fulfill its mission, because its hosting service limits the freedom you granted to these people.

And since I only ever administred one project on it, which has been dormant/dead for years, I decided that I should practice what I preach also when it comes to source code repositories.

So I removed my account there and e-mailed them my reasons of doing so. Kudos SF.net to making removing of one's account easy BTW! :D

If you have to trust your data and work to the cloud, you should do so under rules you agree to and to people you trust.

Now the intention of this post is not to generate any further hate against SF.net, but just to explain my action and to give you another reason why you should read the ToS and PP before you sign it. I know I'm parroting myself now, but it bears repeating:

It might take you half an hour to read it, but you'll be bound to it for ages to come!

So stop acting as consumers, and act as free indivuduals and users you ought to be!

hook out → sipping some Morrocan Mint tea with orange honey and studying Environmental law

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